KPCB 2012 Internet trendsMobile trends
Although I’d picked up the growth of mobiles and tablets overtaking sales of desktop PCs and laptops, one thing that hadn’t become obvious to me was that we now seem to be approaching the time when the number of tablets/smartphones in circulation outnumbers the numbers of desktops/laptops.   December’s Internet Trends survey from Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers shows, in the graph reproduced here, that they’d expect that stage to be reached globally sometime this year.

Although I’d probably have a couple of caveats about smartphone adoption in the developing world slightly skewing the figures, and whether people might ordinarily have more tablets/smartphones than desktops/laptops, it nonetheless emphasises the point that mobile internet access is now mainstream.  For many people it may be their preferred means of accessing your services and their expectation is going to be that it should just work, and give an equivalent or better experience than the ‘traditional’ desktop browser experience.

But numbers of devices doesn’t yet map to the amount of usage of our websites.  For us our traffic is still under 10% from mobiles/tablets, so even if the numbers of devices in circulation is reaching parity, we aren’t yet at a stage where the majority of our use is coming from those devices.  But looking at the trends, that day is on the horizon maybe.

Asset-light
One of the interesting concepts in KPCB’s slideshow is the ‘asset-light’ idea.  KPCB 2012 Internet treands screenshotThe idea that more and more people, perhaps younger people especially, may be less inclined to wanting to own or acquire physical ‘stuff’ and have a more ‘mobile’ (as in being able to move more readily) lifestyle.  Characterised as having your music on spotify or iTunes rather than on physical CDs, or renting rather than buying your textbooks.  It also has in mind for me a personal version of the concept of ‘Just-in-time’ the production strategy based around reducing inventory in favour of delivery of items when you need them.  It’s the concept of ‘on-demand’ rather than ownership ‘just-in-case’.

Potentially, as characterised in this blogpost on Fail!lab it might mean major changes to our library websites, or even the concept of websites.  It’s a good and interesting thought.  For a while we’ve certainly been pushing content into places where students go, such as pushing library resources via RSS feeds into our VLE.  But these spaces are still websites.  Yet once you’ve got a stream or feed of data then you could push or pull it into numerous places, whether apps or webpages or systems.

The idea in the Fail!Lab blogpost around Artificially intelligent agents doing the ‘heavy-lifting’ of finding resources for users is something that Paul Walk raised as part of his Library Management Systems vision (slideshare and blog post) so it’s interesting to see someone else postulating a similar future.  For me it starts to envisage a future where users choose their environment/tools/agents and we build systems that are capable of feeding data/content to those agents and are built to a set of data sharing standards.  It suggests a time where users are able to write queries to interrogate your systems, whether for content or for help materials or skills development activity, and implies a world of profiles, entitlements and charging mechanisms that are a world away from the current model of – go to this website, signup and pass through the gateway into a ‘library’ of stuff.

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